An experiment in mixed media. How I made it: 
 I started out by “recycling” an old canvas by painting over it with acrylics.  
 Next, I hot-glued some sticks and pine needles to the canvas. It worked surprisingly well and after several weeks, the glue seems to be holding steady. 
 I created some handmade paper, loosely based off of  this tutorial . The paper pulp consisted of scrap printer paper, tissue paper, and leaves. I also threw in some stale bread crust and green food coloring to see what would happen. 
  Discovery #1: blending leaves makes for a smelly blender 
 Discovery #2: blended bread and green food coloring look pretty disgusting together 
 Discovery #3: getting paper to the ideal thickness is difficult and will require more experimentation 
  After creating the paper, I let it dry for a bit (impatience led me to try a hairdryer, which worked pretty well) then used a matte medium to adhere it to the canvas. At this point, the paper was sufficiently pliable to smooth over branches and canvas while still maintaining its rough texture. 
 I let it dry some more, then went to work painting over everything (branches, pine needles, and canvas) with acrylics. After laying down the greens and yellows, I let it dry. Then I added metallic gold accents to the homemade paper using a balled up paper towel for added texture. For the final touch, I painted a real set of leaves then “stamped” them onto the canvas.

An experiment in mixed media. How I made it:

I started out by “recycling” an old canvas by painting over it with acrylics. 

Next, I hot-glued some sticks and pine needles to the canvas. It worked surprisingly well and after several weeks, the glue seems to be holding steady.

I created some handmade paper, loosely based off of this tutorial. The paper pulp consisted of scrap printer paper, tissue paper, and leaves. I also threw in some stale bread crust and green food coloring to see what would happen.

  • Discovery #1: blending leaves makes for a smelly blender
  • Discovery #2: blended bread and green food coloring look pretty disgusting together
  • Discovery #3: getting paper to the ideal thickness is difficult and will require more experimentation

After creating the paper, I let it dry for a bit (impatience led me to try a hairdryer, which worked pretty well) then used a matte medium to adhere it to the canvas. At this point, the paper was sufficiently pliable to smooth over branches and canvas while still maintaining its rough texture.

I let it dry some more, then went to work painting over everything (branches, pine needles, and canvas) with acrylics. After laying down the greens and yellows, I let it dry. Then I added metallic gold accents to the homemade paper using a balled up paper towel for added texture. For the final touch, I painted a real set of leaves then “stamped” them onto the canvas.