Breaking in the pastels I got at Michael’s yesterday (note: there’s a 40% off coupon for pastels in their mail flyer through the end of the week if you’re interested). The last time I used pastels was in high school art class, so I barely remembered what to do with them! A few (re)discoveries: 
  Pastels (the oil-free chalk type) are quite different from oil pastels in terms of blending and layering– once you fill in the grain of the paper, that’s pretty much it.  
 However, a chamois can pick up a bit of pigment and serve as a rough “eraser” if you want to try again. 
 For portraits, getting the “skin tone” color set is totally worth it. So much easier than trying to get blend bright blue/purple/yellow/pink into something “skin-like”. 
 The grain of the paper adds a nice touch that I didn’t really appreciate until taking an up-close photo. Will need to explore choice of paper grain/color in the future. 
 Hands & faces are difficult to get right. More practice definitely required!

Breaking in the pastels I got at Michael’s yesterday (note: there’s a 40% off coupon for pastels in their mail flyer through the end of the week if you’re interested). The last time I used pastels was in high school art class, so I barely remembered what to do with them! A few (re)discoveries:

  • Pastels (the oil-free chalk type) are quite different from oil pastels in terms of blending and layering– once you fill in the grain of the paper, that’s pretty much it.
  • However, a chamois can pick up a bit of pigment and serve as a rough “eraser” if you want to try again.
  • For portraits, getting the “skin tone” color set is totally worth it. So much easier than trying to get blend bright blue/purple/yellow/pink into something “skin-like”.
  • The grain of the paper adds a nice touch that I didn’t really appreciate until taking an up-close photo. Will need to explore choice of paper grain/color in the future.
  • Hands & faces are difficult to get right. More practice definitely required!