w2labs

Men and Women Entrepreneurs: Not That Different

Male & female entrepreneurs are pretty similar:

Both groups had an equally strong desire to build wealth; wanted to capitalize on business ideas; were attracted to the culture of startups; had long-standing desire to own their own company; and were tired of working for others…

Their average ages when founding their first companies were the same. Likewise, successful men and women entrepreneurs founded their first companies when they had similar numbers of children living at home, though men were more likely than women to be married.

That being said,

Only one percent of high-tech startups have a woman CEO; there are almost no women in the ranks of chief technology officers.

Only one percent. Wow. I knew the ratio of women in technology was pretty low, but not this low.

For more research/news on women in tech, check out the Anita Borg Institute.

Also, see Women2.0, an organization whose mission is to “increase the number of female founders of technology startups”.

Logo design for Frankendeal. 
 A long-overdue update on my  Women2.0 Labs  experience: three weeks ago, I teamed up with a group of 3 other entrepreneurs. We rallied around the idea of creating a platform for audio-guided walking tours. Many interviews, surveys, brainstorms, concept tests, mentoring sessions, and nights at  HackerDojo  later, we find that our idea has changed quite a bit. 
 Now we’re hard at work tackling a new problem: how to improve the customer experience of waiting in lines. Our goal is to make it so enjoyable to wait in lines that customers actually look forward to it! We’re exploring the possibility of using location-based mini games to entertain users while providing real-world rewards, such as coupons. Project code name:  Frankendeal . 
 There are still a lot of questions that we need to answer, and problems we’ll need to solve. In the spirit of quick-and-dirty user research, we hung out at a  local coffee shop  last week, observing & engaging with people as they waited in line. We learned a lot about how people deal with lines– what they do, how they feel, how it affects their overall experience. We also got a lot of great feedback on our idea! 
 This week, we’re developing a very rough prototype that we can get into users’ hands to gauge actual interest and usage. Our first iteration is  very  simple and focuses on the following game elements that resonated with users: 
  short duration 
 potential for real-world reward 
 game is somewhat challenging, rather than being “mindless” 
 tied to location (using the foursquare API) 
  I’ll keep you posted as lightning strikes and brings Frankendeal to life! 
 Thanks again to all who have helped out by participating in interviews, surveys, usability, and more. You are truly wonderful.

Logo design for Frankendeal.

A long-overdue update on my Women2.0 Labs experience: three weeks ago, I teamed up with a group of 3 other entrepreneurs. We rallied around the idea of creating a platform for audio-guided walking tours. Many interviews, surveys, brainstorms, concept tests, mentoring sessions, and nights at HackerDojo later, we find that our idea has changed quite a bit.

Now we’re hard at work tackling a new problem: how to improve the customer experience of waiting in lines. Our goal is to make it so enjoyable to wait in lines that customers actually look forward to it! We’re exploring the possibility of using location-based mini games to entertain users while providing real-world rewards, such as coupons. Project code name: Frankendeal.

There are still a lot of questions that we need to answer, and problems we’ll need to solve. In the spirit of quick-and-dirty user research, we hung out at a local coffee shop last week, observing & engaging with people as they waited in line. We learned a lot about how people deal with lines– what they do, how they feel, how it affects their overall experience. We also got a lot of great feedback on our idea!

This week, we’re developing a very rough prototype that we can get into users’ hands to gauge actual interest and usage. Our first iteration is very simple and focuses on the following game elements that resonated with users:

  • short duration
  • potential for real-world reward
  • game is somewhat challenging, rather than being “mindless”
  • tied to location (using the foursquare API)

I’ll keep you posted as lightning strikes and brings Frankendeal to life!

Thanks again to all who have helped out by participating in interviews, surveys, usability, and more. You are truly wonderful.